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20130211
20130219
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
the president's foreign policy priorities ought to be, looking at response to the turmoil of the arab spring, dealing with russia wouldn't seem to be anyone's natural first priority right now. jenna: one of the arguments, though, for doing this, according to "the new york times," is it would save a lot of money. if we don't have to keep these nuclear weapons and store them and watch them, that's going to save us a lot of cash, and we know the type of financial situation we're in right now. why isn't that a good argument? >> one, everyone would like to save cash, but really we've had $5 trillion added to our national debt over recent years, and maintenance of our nuclear strategic capability contributed nothing to that. and the proposed cuts, they say, would reduce about $120 billion in spending over 20 years, which is really a drop in the wasn't compared -- bucket compared to approaching $20 trillion in national debt. the second is the cut into intellectual capabilities well that should be stimulating economic development, research and development and applied technology. hitting these areas,
business is our business. adt. always there. jenna: welcome back, everyone. it's a foreign policy flashback if you will with new concerns today over iran and north korea, two countries singled out by president george w. bush nor than a decade ago during his state of the union address. remember this? >> north korea has a regime arming with missiles and weapons of mass destruction while starving its citizens. iran aggressively pursues these weapons and exports terror while an unelected few reexpress the iranian's people's' hope for freedom. iraq continues to flaunt its hostility toward america and support terror. states like these and these terrorist allies constitute an axis of evil arming to threaten the peace of the world. jenna: well two charter members of the axis of evil iran and north korea both in the spotlight at this year's state of the union. take a listen. >> our challenges don't end with al-qaida. america will continue to lead the effort to prevent the spread of the world's most dangerous weapons. the regime in north korea must know they will only achieve security and prosperity
on capitol hill blasting the obama administration, the chairman of the house foreign affairs committee, republican ed royce, is calling on the administration to replace what he calls a failed north korea policy. chief white house or correspondent ed henry is live on the north lawn. ed, do we expect the president to mention this north korea mess in his state of the union speech tonight? and if so, if i may, how does it fit into his agenda? >> reporter: sure, arthel. bottom line is the president's aides say he is likely to mention this essentially failed test by the north koreans tonight. they are deeply concerned here at the white house, though, that know keeps doing these tests. as you say, the president put out a written statement calling this provocative, and they're basically saying, though, in the end it didn't really work, is so they don't think north korea is as far along in their nuclear program as certainly north korea hopes. nonetheless, we think the president will mention it, not dwell on it tonight. instead, he wants to talk about the economy and jobs according to top aides.
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)